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Archive for the ‘terminal’ Category

Installing Linux on an UltraSparc 10 via serial console

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Aye, the Ultra 10 (Model 440) finally came in yesterday.

Headless mode install definitely works–here’s how:

  1. Get your Linux media burnt. Ensure your bootloader settings support serial console I/O (I tried using a nightly ubuntu-server/sparc .iso).
  2. Get your serial console working with your Ultra 10. You will need a DB9 (com) port, which is commonly called ttyb. If your sparc didn’t come with one, you can order them online.
  3. You will need a null modem cable, and a terminal on the other end of the cable to capture I/O.
  4. Boot via serial console, OpenBoot will load, at the “ok” prompt, type “printenv”. Take careful note.
  5. Set any variables you need to, using “setenv” (i.e., to ensure your terminal settings are correct). Some useful ones: auto-boot?, boot, input-device, output-device, reset.
  6. You can also do this in blind-mode: headless using a keyboard plugged in locally to the sparc, hitting STOP-A once the keyboard LEDs stop blinking, and setting output-device and input-device, for example, to terminal, or screen/keyboard.
  7. Now that it’s all working, put in the Linux media, boot, and at the “ok” prompt type “boot cdrom”.
  8. Install your distro. All the stock hardware should be supported. Make note that SILO (LILO for Sparc) has specific requirements in terms of the disk (it must be installed within the first gigabyte).
  9. It failed during the ubuntu-server setup process. Continue it regardless and complete the installation process.
  10. Reboot the cdrom, and enter rescue mode. Mount the drive(s) that you just installed, and install the silo package (i.e., using apt-get for debian/ubuntu). It installed without incident for me here.

This information was tested on an Sun Ultra 10, 440-MHz UltraSPARC IIi, 2MB external cache, 1GB memory, 3D card, 2 x 9GB disk drives.

Written by art

January 25th, 2008 at 1:46 am

Posted in hardware,terminal,unix

Getting BSD, Home, End, Putty, and screen to play nice

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… you can try putting shit into your /etc/inputrc (or ~/.inputrc):

"\e[1~": beginning-of-line
"\e[4~": end-of-line
"\e[5~": beginning-of-history
"\e[6~": end-of-history
"\e[3~": delete-char
"\e[2~": quoted-insert
"\e[5C": forward-word
"\e[5D": backward-word

You will have to re-login to your terminal session for these changes to take effect. But that may not fix anything in screen, until you change the $TERM in your screen session:

bash-3.2$ cat ~/.screenrc
term linux

… which means you have to restart your screen session for the changes to take effect. "term vt220" is also a good choice, but if you tend to use syntax highlighting with vim, for instance, or any other high-tech features of your system, it may look ugly-underliney.

Written by art

December 7th, 2007 at 12:26 am

putty – Vista fonts (Lucida Console) and unix consoles

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lucida_console-vs-terminal Aye, it was a pain to get this one going properly with the line drawing:

Set the font to Lucida Console, which should have been installed with Vista. If you’re using a linux terminal you might as well make sure the linux keyboard layout is selected as well.

For lines and other special characters, set the line drawing to Unicode. Lucida Console has Unicode lines. This is also why it doesn’t work with Terminal or Fixedsys fonts in Vista, woe is me, I spent ages trying to figure that one out.

Unless you know you’re using another translation page, set the translation to UTF8.

Things should look a lot better now!

Written by art

November 11th, 2007 at 12:57 am